CRPS – You Don’t Have To Give In To Your Pain…

I attended the RSDSA conference in LaJolla yesterday.  The theme of the conference was, “Treating the Whole Person: Optimizing Wellness.”  I love the philosophy behind treating the whole person and optimizing wellness, because that is how each person will regain their life.  That’s how I did it!  

 

It was a great experience to meet other people that had been diagnosed with CRPS/RSD and their caretakers.  I’ll be honest this was the first RSDSA conference that I had been to.  I look forward to going to more in the future and hopefully being a speaker too.

 

One common thread that I heard throughout the day was different ways for CRPS patients to cope with their pain, to put small goals in place that they can achieve, to stay grounded, to look to the positive, etc.  I love all of these suggestions.  I know they help and are key in helping to get through those tough days when pain levels are high.

 

Yet from a couple of the doctors that spoke I heard comments that I didn’t agree with:  “Providing mere relief…”, “Results are good…” and “Healthier with their CRPS”.  As someone that was diagnosed with CRPS (type 2), lived with it for 6+ years, tried all Traditional treatment options, was treated globally, and finally gained remission in 2013 – I think I can say that from a patient prospective the above comments were not music to my ears.  Yes, it is important to be as healthy as possible but it is just as important to have some type of tangible results for the patient in regards to dramatically decreasing pain levels on a long-term basis.

 

I heard heartwarming stories about young ladies that pushed through their pain to regain some normalcy in their life, but they are still dealing with the CRPS demons.  Whether it was a new injury that caused the CRPS to return or perhaps it people have learned to push through their pain; either way there has to be a better way.

 

There is a huge push for Ketamine Infusion therapy right now for CRPS and other conditions.  I know it can bring short-term relief to CRPS patients and then follow-up Ketamine boosts are needed to stay pain free.  Is this the right treatment option for you?

 

I listened to a Naturopathic Doctor talk about the need to change the paradigm and balance the body.  I completely agree with these statements.  What I didn’t agree with was being “healthier with CRPS”.  I don’t know about you but I can be the healthiest person on this planet but if I am still in pain then I am not too happy.   I’ve actually treated athletes that were diagnosed with CRPS.  Their concern was centered around their pain.

 

What we have to look at is CRPS and most chronic pain conditions including chronic migraines are also tied into the Limbic System in the brain.  Dr. Sajben talked about the glia and how important they are in the pain process.  We have to take into consideration the ‘mind-body’ connection if we want to break the pain loop, help CRPS and chronic pain patients to get out of fight/flight, to balance the ANS, and address many other issues associated with chronic pain.  These connections have to be made.  Then we have to treat the whole person.  This is not just the chronic pain.  It is everything tied in with it:  stress, anxiety, insomnia, depression, and/or PTSD.  Once an individual is able to regain normalcy in these areas then they will regain their life.  Yes, it is possible.

 

I personally don’t believe that any person diagnosed with chronic pain has to give in to their pain or live with extremely high pain levels.  With HCT (Hypnosis Combined Therapy) we have found that chronic pain patients, CRPS, and other diagnosis have been able to dramatically decrease pain levels and many gain remission.  This is an evidence based, non-invasive, drug-free protocol that is providing long-term relief.  HCT: clinical hypnosis, biofeedback, light/sound therapy, neuroplasticity training, working with the Limbic System, cell memory and more… is allowing people to regain their lives when they thought they had exhausted all their options. 

 

It is important for every pain patient on a global basis to find the treatment protocol that is right for them.  We are all individuals and as such what works for one may not work for all.  Please do your research, ask questions and be your own advocate. 

 

PTSD: Facts, Signs and Treatment Options

By:  Traci Patterson, CH, CI – Owner, Advanced Pathways Hypnosis

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), once called shell shock or battle fatigue syndrome, is a serious condition that can develop after a person has experienced or witnessed a traumatic or terrifying event in which serious physical harm occurred or was threatened. PTSD is a lasting consequence of traumatic ordeals that cause intense fear, helplessness, or horror, such as a sexual or physical assault, the unexpected death of a loved one, an accident, war, or natural disaster. Families of victims can also develop PTSD, as can emergency personnel and rescue workers.

Sometimes these symptoms don’t surface for months or years after the event or returning from deployment. They may also come and go. If these problems won’t go away or are getting worse—or you feel like they are disrupting your daily life—you may have PTSD.

You feel on edge. Nightmares keep coming back. Sudden noises make you jump. You’re staying at home more and more, and isolating yourself from the outside world.  Could you have PTSD?

If you have experienced severe trauma or a life-threatening event, you may develop symptoms of posttraumatic stress, commonly known as posttraumatic stress disorder, PTSD, shell shock, or combat stress. Maybe you felt like your life or the lives of others were in danger, or that you had no control over what was happening. You may have witnessed people being injured or dying, or you may have been physically harmed yourself.

Some of the most common symptoms of PTSD include recurring memories or nightmares of the event(s), sleeplessness, loss of interest, or feeling numb, anger, and irritability, but there are many ways PTSD can impact your everyday life.

Some factors can increase the likelihood of a traumatic event leading to PTSD, such as:

  • The intensity of the trauma
  • Being hurt or losing a loved one
  • Being physically close to the traumatic event
  • Feeling you were not in control
  • Having a lack of support after the event

Most people who experience a traumatic event will have reactions that may include shock, anger, nervousness, fear, and even guilt. These reactions are common; and for most people, they go away over time. For a person with PTSD, however, these feelings continue and even increase, becoming so strong that they keep the person from living a normal life. People with PTSD have symptoms for longer than one month and cannot function as well as before the event occurred.

What Are the Symptoms of PTSD?

Symptoms of PTSD most often begin within three months of the event. In some cases, however, they do not begin until years later. The severity and duration of the illness vary. Some people recover within six months, while others suffer much longer.

Symptoms of PTSD often are grouped into three main categories, including:

  • Reliving: People with PTSD repeatedly relive the ordeal through thoughts and memories of the trauma. These may include flashbacks, hallucinations, and nightmares. They also may feel great distress when certain things remind them of the trauma, such as the anniversary date of the event.
  • Avoiding: The person may avoid people, places, thoughts, or situations that may remind him or her of the trauma. This can lead to feelings of detachment and isolation from family and friends, as well as a loss of interest in activities that the person once enjoyed.
  • Increased Emotions: These include excessive emotions; problems relating to others, including feeling or showing affection; difficulty falling or staying asleep; irritability; outbursts of anger; difficulty concentrating; and being “jumpy” or easily startled. The person may also suffer physical symptoms, such as increased blood pressure and heart rate, rapid breathing, muscle tension, nausea, and diarrhea.

Young children with PTSD may suffer from delayed development in areas such as toilet training, motor skills, and language.

Who Gets PTSD?

Everyone reacts to traumatic events differently. Each person is unique in his or her ability to manage fear and stress and to cope with the threat posed by a traumatic event or situation. For that reason, not everyone who experiences or witnesses a trauma will develop PTSD. Further, the type of help and support a person receives from friends, family members and professionals following the trauma may influence the development of PTSD or the severity of symptoms.

PTSD was first brought to the attention of the medical community by war veterans, hence the names shell shock and battle fatigue syndrome. However, PTSD can occur in anyone who has experienced a traumatic event. People who have been abused as children or who have been repeatedly exposed to life-threatening situations are at greater risk for developing PTSD. Victims of trauma related to physical and sexual assault face the greatest risk for PTSD.  Chronic pain patients that have been through numerous procedures, surgeries and have dealt with immense pain for years face the risk for developing PTSD.

What are the signs of PTSD?

A wide variety of symptoms may be signs you are experiencing PTSD:

  • Feeling upset by things that remind you of what happened
  • Having nightmares, vivid memories, or flashbacks of the event that make you feel like it’s happening all over again
  • Feeling emotionally cut off from others
  • Feeling numb or losing interest in things you used to care about
  • Becoming depressed
  • Thinking that you are always in danger
  • Feeling anxious, jittery, or irritated
  • Experiencing a sense of panic that something bad is about to happen
  • Having difficulty sleeping
  • Having trouble keeping your mind on one thing
  • Having a hard time relating to and getting along with your spouse, family, or friends

It’s not just the symptoms of PTSD but also how you may react to them that can disrupt your life. You may:

  • Frequently avoid places or things that remind you of what happened
  • Consistent drinking or use of drugs to numb your feelings
  • Consider harming yourself or others
  • Start working all the time to occupy your mind
  • Pull away from other people and become isolated

What is the treatment for PTSD?

If you have PTSD, it doesn’t mean you just have to live with it. In recent years, researchers from around the world have dramatically increased our understanding of what causes PTSD and how to treat it.

Traditional medicine will state there are two types of treatment that have been shown to be effective for treating PTSD: counseling and medication. Professional counseling can help you understand your thoughts and discover ways to cope with your feelings. Medications, called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are used to help you feel less worried or sad.

Unfortunately, many people that undergo these two types of treatment are still left with signs and symptoms of PTSD.

I recently read an article about some new research where they were utilizing MRT (Magnet Resonance Therapy) to help treat PTSD.  Yes, it is a drug-free and non-invasive treatment option, but at the same time every treatment it exposing the patient to radiation.  The treatment protocol is daily 30 minutes treatment for up to two months. What a tradeoff, radiation exposure for possible relief of PTSD.

The other option is also a drug-free, non-invasive treatment protocol that involves clinical hypnosis with a multi-therapeutic approach.  This combination works with the neuroplasticity of the brain, the physiology of the body and mixes that with hypnosis to give patients a scientifically designed program to meet their personal needs.  Our approach empowers the patient to take charge of their health, life, to open up new pathways and create a more succinct, healthy and successful future.

You may need to work with your doctor or counselor and try different types of treatment before finding the one that’s best for dealing with your PTSD symptoms.

What can I do if I think I have PTSD?

In addition to getting treatment, you can adjust your lifestyle to help relieve PTSD symptoms. For example, talking with other Veterans or individuals who have experienced trauma can help you connect with and trust others, exercising can help reduce physical tension, and volunteering can help you reconnect with your community. You also can let your friends and family know when certain places or activities make you uncomfortable.

Your close friends and family may be the first to notice that you’re having a tough time. Turn to them when you are ready to talk. It can be helpful to share what you’re experiencing, and they may be able to provide support and help you find treatment that is right for you.

Take the Next Step – Connect:

Whether you just returned from a deployment, you’ve been home for 40 years, or you’re dealing with PTSD from chronic pain – it’s never too late to get professional treatment or support for PTSD. Receiving counseling or treatment as soon as possible can keep your symptoms from getting worse.

You can also consider connecting with:

  • Your family doctor: Ask if your doctor has experience treating PTSD or can refer you to someone who does
  • A mental health professional, such as a therapist
  • Your local VA Medical Center or Vet Center: VA specializes in the care and treatment of Veterans
  • A spiritual or religious advisor
  • Advanced Pathways Hypnosis

If you or a loved one is living with PTSD and traditional treatments have not helped please consider contacting Advanced Pathways Hypnosis.  We offer a drug-free, non-invasive treatment option that is scientifically designed.  Advanced Pathways utilizes a multi-therapeutic approach based on breakthrough research from leading academic institutions to ensure the best result for our patients.

Contact us today at (714) 717-6633 for a FREE confidential telephone consultation, or contact us via email at: Info@AdvancedPathways.com.

Ways to Choose Happiness

I love when I notice I’m smiling. You know those times when you are just at ease and a little smile comes across your face, that smile. The smile isn’t falsely constructed to please anyone else. Rather, it’s naturally powered by my inner bliss, which radiates and beams through my being.

After many years of dealing with chronic pain, working through all the issues that come up with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), the deep valleys, I can honestly say that I’m at a place in my life where I seem to have found greater peace and more bountiful joy. My eyes have a keen way of drinking in all the vibrant images and colors of life around me. My mind is free to dream. My heart sings. My spirit dances. My body feels all that is good.

I choose the path of hope and happiness.

It’s been 10 years since the day I started my journey with CRPS and have emerged on the other side. Now treating clients with chronic pain, CRPS, Fibromyalgia and cancer pain and working on my own spiritual journey, I recommend the following ways to choose happiness:

  1. Don’t attach your happiness to anything external. We run into problems when we make our happiness dependent on our relationships, jobs, finances, our health or on anticipated outcomes. Happiness is an inner experience that is yours to claim. Everything else is impermanent.
  2. Give freely. Give and share what you can, whenever you can. Give compliments, love, affection, help, resources, time, consideration, thoughtfulness, respect, empathy, etc. It feels delightful and karma will bring it back to you, threefold.
  3. Receive openly. Accept compliments, help and gifts. Embrace touch and praise. Absorb love and affection. Remember that the act of receiving allows other people the experience of giving.
  4. Appreciate life’s precious moments. Don’t be too busy or caught in your own “mind chatter” to notice the little bird out your window, the newborn baby in her mother’s arms in the elevator, the elderly couple holding hands, or the fuzzy ducks in the pond. Take time to notice all that is precious, tender and miraculous in life.
  5. Play & be silly. Remember how it was to play freely as a child. Shed self-consciousness, let go and have fun. I love playing with my kids; surprising them and reminding myself about the impish little girl inside me. Perhaps nothing makes my heart swell more than hysterical fits of laughter shared with my daughters.
  6. Consciously connect with sunlight. Be aware of the sunlight and mindful of feeling it on your face and body. Bask in its warmth and light. Feel your connection with this life-giving energy source.
  7. Be mindful of physical pleasures. Notice how soft your bed feels, how good your food tastes, how wonderful the warm sun feels on your skin… Enjoy and appreciate these fantastic sensations.
  8. Stay firmly rooted in the present moment. Unhappiness occurs when we obsess about the past or worry about the future. Peace and serenity are found in the present moment. Practice deep breathing, meditation and other mindfulness techniques to establish presence.
  9. Look for the good part. Practice gratitude to stay positive. See the goodness in yourself, in others and in the world around you.
  10. Be a duck. Let negative stuff roll off your back. Life’s too short to expend energy getting your feathers ruffled.
  11. Tend to your environment. Make your home and office comfortable and cheerful. Surround yourself with things that elicit positive emotions and make you smile.
  12. Take excellent care of yourself. Take care of your physical and mental health as if you were your own precious child whom you love very much.
  13. Set healthy boundaries for yourself. Set the limits you need at work and at home with regard to time, space, money, etc. Don’t over-schedule or over-commit.
  14. Surround yourself with people who make you feel alive. I so cherish my friends &/or family members who make me laugh with abandon. It’s with them that I choose to spend my time.
  15. Practice self-care. Everyday. Prioritize your wellness and practice meditation, go for a run, read a novel, tend to your garden or do anything that reboots your mind, body and spirit.
  16. Express yourself freely and openly. Find your voice and say what you need to say. Dare to show yourself via your writing, artwork, dance or other creative expression.
  17. Ensure you like yourself. Be kind. Have integrity. Be the person you have always wanted to be.

18, Be true to yourself. Be honest. Be real. Be vulnerable. Be brave.  Let your inner light be your guide.

“Happiness is not something you get in life, happiness is something that you bring to life. “ ~Wayne Dyer

If you would like more information on the author, Traci Patterson or Advanced Pathways Hypnosis please contact:

Traci@AdvancedPathways.com | 714.717.6633 |  www.AdvancedPathways.com